This Karnataka-based biker doesn’t mind ‘dirt’ on the racetrack – The New Indian Express

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Express press service

UDUPI: This female biker is thrilled when she rides her bike and becomes one with the machine as she tears down a race track. It’s almost as if the bike breathes life into him. Apoorva Bykadi (25), whose passion for two hot wheels led her to track racing, proved that the sport is not just for men. Unafraid of the bruises and scars that come with sports, she pursues her passion quite seriously.

Since the age of 16, Apoorva has always wanted to take up bicycle racing, which she considered an expensive sport. While pursuing a degree in mechanical engineering at Nitte, she didn’t think much of it, especially since she also played basketball and handball. She had also won a bronze medal at the Muay Thai Indian National Federation, organized by the Senior National Amateur Muay Thai Championship, held in Sikkim in 2017.

Yet Apoorva never gave up on his dream of bicycle racing, even though there were no opportunities to learn it in the coastal districts. She thought she should go to Chennai to take lessons, but continued to ride her normal bike, stifling her enthusiasm.

In 2015, she joined the Mangalore Bikerni group, which set her on the path to adventure. “We have a team in Mangalore Bikerni, an all-female chapter in the coastal town. When I joined the group, I started to love and explore cycling,” she says.

After her mechanical engineering in 2018, Apoorva joined an edutech company in Udupi as a business development associate, but the 9am to 5pm job meant giving up sports and she started to feel apathetic. Suddenly things changed when she came across a poster on Instagram about a one-brand TVS championship to be held in Bangalore in 2019. “In a one-brand championship, everyone gets bikes from the same brand to compete. It was a training and selection process,” she said.

”I never thought I would be selected at the time. But I did, and the stuff I learned there helped me a lot. Initially it was circuit racing, but now I’m also into track racing,’ she said. There were 45 women from different age groups, many of whom were social media stars. Apoorva was selected in the southern zone. In the MRF MoGrip FMSCI Indian National Rally Championship 2W (Ladies Class) event held in Chikkamagaluru, and Rally De Mangaluru – Round 2 of the MRF MoGrip FMSCI Indian National Rally Championship in Panja, Apoorva won second prize . She is also convinced to give the best of herself in the next rounds.

She gave up her job to pursue her passion, with her parents Bharathi and BK Narayan giving her all their support. ”I am happy that my parents accepted my preference. My dad let me explore the sport independently,” Apoorva says proudly. Yogish, a Superbike mechanic and owner of KAT Racing, helped her learn the intricacies of the machine. Apoorva also got his modified Hero Impulse from Yogish, which tunes bikes for races.

Running is an incredible experience, she says. “Circuit racing is all about speed and braking. The mind is completely focused. A second of distraction can spoil the party. Track racing is about body balance, endurance and managing our bikes. The two categories require different skills. Dirt races are quite difficult because there are obstacles like rocks, gravel, mud and slush, and all parts of the body have to focus on them,” she says.

Racing championships mean spending a tidy amount of money, she admits. Entry fees are usually high, and for national rallies each round costs 4,000 rupees, with six rounds in all. The cyclist must call a mechanic because the bike can break down at any time, and guards and friends also accompany the cyclist.

UDUPI: This female biker is thrilled when she rides her bike and becomes one with the machine as she tears down a race track. It’s almost as if the bike breathes life into him. Apoorva Bykadi (25), whose passion for two hot wheels led her to track racing, proved that the sport is not just for men. Unafraid of the bruises and scars that come with sports, she pursues her passion quite seriously. Since the age of 16, Apoorva has always wanted to take up bicycle racing, which she considered an expensive sport. While pursuing a degree in mechanical engineering at Nitte, she didn’t think much of it, especially since she also played basketball and handball. She had also won a bronze medal at the Muay Thai Indian National Federation, hosted by the Senior National Amateur Muay Thai Championship, held in Sikkim in 2017. Yet Apoorva never gave up on her dream of bike racing , although there is no option to learn it in the coastal districts. She thought she should go to Chennai to take lessons, but continued to ride her normal bike, stifling her enthusiasm. In 2015, she joined the Mangalore Bikerni group, which set her on the path to adventure. “We have a team in Mangalore Bikerni, an all-female chapter in the coastal town. When I joined the group, I started to love and explore cycling,” she says. After her mechanical engineering in 2018, Apoorva joined an edutech company in Udupi as a business development associate, but the 9am to 5pm job meant giving up sports and she started to feel apathetic. Suddenly things changed when she came across a poster on Instagram about a one-brand TVS championship to be held in Bangalore in 2019. “In a one-brand championship, everyone gets bikes from the same brand to compete. It was a training and selection process,” she said. ”I never thought I would be selected at the time. But I did, and the stuff I learned there helped me a lot. Initially it was circuit racing, but now I’m also into track racing,’ she said. There were 45 women from different age groups, many of whom were social media stars. Apoorva was selected in the southern zone. In the MRF MoGrip FMSCI Indian National Rally Championship 2W (Ladies Class) event held in Chikkamagaluru, and Rally De Mangaluru – Round 2 of the MRF MoGrip FMSCI Indian National Rally Championship in Panja, Apoorva won second prize . She is also convinced to give the best of herself in the next rounds. She gave up her job to pursue her passion, with her parents Bharathi and BK Narayan giving her all their support. ”I am happy that my parents accepted my preference. My dad let me explore the sport independently,” Apoorva says proudly. Yogish, a Superbike mechanic and owner of KAT Racing, helped her learn the intricacies of the machine. Apoorva also got his modified Hero Impulse from Yogish, which tunes bikes for races. Running is an incredible experience, she says. “Circuit racing is all about speed and braking. The mind is completely focused. A second of distraction can spoil the party. Track racing is about body balance, endurance and managing our bikes. The two categories require different skills. Dirt races are quite difficult because there are obstacles like rocks, gravel, mud and slush, and all parts of the body have to focus on them,” she says. Racing championships mean spending a tidy amount of money, she admits. Entry fees are usually high, and for national rallies each round costs 4,000 rupees, with six rounds in all. The cyclist must call a mechanic because the bike can break down at any time, and guards and friends also accompany the cyclist.

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